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Conference Schedule

Seminar Outlines, Program Descriptions, and Menus

February 26 and 27, 2018

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Sunday Feb 25, 2018

 

8:00pm - 9:00pm 

 

Hotel Lobby

Early Arrival Conference Registration and Hospitality

 

6:30pm - 12:00am

Exhibitor Set-up

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Monday February 26, 2018

 

7:00am - 8:00am

 

Mckinley & Hayes Rooms   (located on the first floor)

(Sponsored by Jensen Hughes)

Continental Breakfast Break

 

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8:30am - 11:00am

 

Franklin Rooms A, B, C, & D 

(Sponsored by Johnson Controls / SimplexGrinnell)

Conference Open and Keynote Session

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11:00am - 12:00pm

 

Franklin Lobby / Exhibit area

Golden Hour of Technology

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12:00pm - 1:00pm

 

McKinley & Hayes Meeting Rooms  (located on the first floor)

(Sponsored by Jensen Hughes)  

Lunch

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1:00pm - 2:00pm

 

Franklin Rooms A & B
Sponsored by Telgian

101 - Overview of Fire Alarms

 

Franklin Rooms C & D
UL Firefighter Safety Research Institute - Firefighter Safety Symposium
201 -
Core Concepts of Fire Fighting (Hour 1 of 2)


Union Rooms C & D

005 - How to Conduct a Fire Evacuation Analysis

 

Union Rooms A & B

Sponsored by Jensen Hughes

  301 - Understanding Which Codes Apply to Fire Alarm Systems (Ohio) -
   Changes to fire alarm requirements in the new Ohio Building Code

 

Taft Room A   (located on the first floor)

020 - Fire Protection Challenges of Rooftop Solar Panels  

 

Taft Room C   (located on the first floor)

014 - Changes to the 2018 ICC and NFPA Models Codes

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2:15pm - 3:15pm

 

Franklin Rooms A & B
Sponsored by Telgian

102 - International Fire Code (IFC) Chapter 9 - Significant changes to the fire alarm section  

 

Franklin Rooms C & D
UL Firefighter Safety Research Institute - Firefighter Safety Symposium

201 - Core Concepts of Fire Fighting (Hour 2 of 2)


Union Rooms C & D

  040 - NFPA 25 - 2014 Update

 

Union Rooms A & B

Sponsored by Jensen Hughes

302 - Understanding Smoke Control Systems

 

Taft Room A   (located on the first floor)

019 - You Can Hear Me, But Do You Understand?? - Reaching the International Student and Members of Your Community so Language Barriers Do NOT Stop Your “Fire Prevention and Safety”

 

Taft Room C   (located on the first floor)

027 - Setting Up ICS (Incident Command System) for Large and Small Scale Special Events

 

 

 

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3:15pm - 3:45pm

 

Franklin Lobby / Exhibit area

(Sponsored by Jensen Hughes)

Afternoon Break with Exhibitors

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3:45pm - 4:45pm

Franklin Rooms A & B
Sponsored by Telgian

   103 - In-Building Radio Systems / Two Way Radio Systems

 

Franklin Rooms C & D
UL Firefighter Safety Research Institute - Firefighter Safety Symposium

202 - Overview of FSRI Research Projects

 

Union Rooms C & D

004 - An Executive Fire Officer Applied Research Project: Preventing Bathroom Exhaust Fan Fires

  .

Union Rooms A & B

   039 - NFPA 72 - 2016 Edition Update


 

Taft Room A   (located on the first floor)

031 - FireCARES - Using Big Data to Make Your Community Safer

 

Taft Room C   (located on the first floor)

024 - Every Bear Goes Home

 

 

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Tuesday February 27, 2018

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6:30am - 7:30am

 

Mckinley & Hayes Rooms   (located on the first floor)

(Sponsored by Jensen Hughes)

Continental Breakfast Break

 

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8:00am - 9:00am

Franklin Rooms A & B
Sponsored by Telgian

   104 – NFPA 25 Misunderstood, Misinterpreted, and Misapplied

 

Franklin Rooms C & D
UL Firefighter Safety Research Institute - Firefighter Safety Symposium

203 - Changing the Culture of the Fireground from the Ground Up


Union Rooms C & D

009 - Fire Safety During High Profile Events: Crowds, Security, and ‘What did you just ask for? 

 

Union Rooms A & B

012 Mass Timber Fire Safety – Myths and Misconceptions for this New Construction Type

 

Taft Room A   (located on the first floor)

025 - Improving Fire Safety Preparedness in Study Abroad

 

Taft Room C   (located on the first floor)

006 - Understanding / Implementing Mass Notification Technologies in Compliance with NFPA 72

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9:00am - 9:30am

 

Franklin Lobby / Exhibit area

(Sponsored by Jensen Hughes)

Mid-Morning Break with Exhibitors

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9:30am - 10:30am

Franklin Rooms A & B
Sponsored by Telgian

105 - Applying the 3 E’s to Exiting

 

Franklin Rooms C & D
UL Firefighter Safety Research Institute - Firefighter Safety Symposium

205 Control Interventions, Tactical Considerations   


Union Rooms C & D

   041 - Fire Alarm Certification Program

 

 

Union Rooms A & B

Sponsored by Jensen Hughes

305 - Purposefully Delayed Fire Alarm Notification

 

Taft Room A   (located on the first floor)

003 - Tactical Alternatives for Off - Campus Housing Fire Safety Program Design: Early Parental Intervention and Improved Guidance for Stakeholders  

 

Taft Room C   (located on the first floor)

018 - Effectively Communicating Active Shooter Response Training in a Campus Environment

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10:45am - 11:45am

Franklin Rooms A & B 
Sponsored by Telgian

   106 – NFPA 25 and 72: Compliance Need Not Break the Bank

 

Franklin Rooms C & D
UL Firefighter Safety Research Institute - Firefighter Safety Symposium

204 - Firefighter Exposure and Cancer Research


Union Rooms C & D

026 - One Bite at a Time; Breaking Down Complex Emergency Preparedness Exercises into Bite Sized Pieces

 

Union Rooms A & B 

Sponsored by Jensen Hughes

306 - Mass Notification Systems [Hour 1 of 2] Understanding Risk Analysis and Emergency Planning and Their Impact on Emergency Communications Systems Design

  

Taft Room A   (located on the first floor)

030 - Stop and Knock on their front door – Make your Resident Advisors “Movie Stars”. Entertaining, proven and highly effective methods to deliver fire safety information to students.

 

Taft Room C   (located on the first floor)

015 - Fire Department Operations in High-Rise and Large-Area Structures

 .

Union Room E

021 - Fire Protection During Construction

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12:00pm - 1:00pm

 

Hayes Meeting Room   (located on the first floor)

(Sponsored by Jensen Hughes)

Lunch

 

Mckinley Meeting Room  (located on the first floor)

(Sponsored by Fire Code Academy)

Ohio Fire Officials Meeting and Lunch

 

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1:00pm - 2:00pm

 

Franklin Rooms A & B
Sponsored by Telgian

   107 - Stationary Fire Pumps 100- Installation and Maintenance Basics

 

Franklin Rooms C & D
UL Firefighter Safety Research Institute - Firefighter Safety Symposium

206 - Apparatus Inspections A path to Fire Fighter Safety


Union Rooms C & D

035 - Special Events Risk Assessment: Understanding the Basics

 

Union Rooms A & B

Sponsored by Jensen Hughes

306 - Mass Notification Systems [Hour 2 of 2] - Understanding Risk Analysis and Emergency Planning and Their Impact on Emergency Communications Systems Design

 

Taft Room A   (located on the first floor)

036 - After the Fire [Hour 1 of 2]  See Program Description on Main Conference Page

 

Taft Room C   (located on the first floor)

023 - Short term property rentals of 4 bedrooms or less advertised on websites like Airbnb.com and VRBO.com

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2:15pm - 3:15pm

 

Franklin Rooms A & B
Sponsored by Telgian

108 - Using Fire Alarm Systems as Part of Your Arson Investigation - Description pending approval

 

Franklin Rooms C & D
UL Firefighter Safety Research Institute - Firefighter Safety Symposium

207 - Ensuring Occupant and Fire Fighter Safety Through Building Inspection Programs

 

Union Rooms C & D

   034 - Fire Sprinkler Heads 101 – New Technology in Fire Protection

 

Union Rooms A & B

Sponsored by Jensen Hughes

308 Structural Hazards of Overhead Solar Panels to Responding Fire Fighters

 

Taft Room A   (located on the first floor)

036 - After the Fire [Hour 2 of 2]  See Program Description on Main Conference Page

 

Taft Room C   (located on the first floor)

016 A “Top 10” list for AHJ’s, Inspectors, Code Officials - NFPA 96 & ANSI C-10 Code Review

 

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Workshop and  Program Descriptions

 

003 - Tactical Alternatives for Off - Campus Housing Fire Safety Program Design:

Early Parental Intervention and Improved Guidance for Stakeholders

Presented by:  John F. Walsh, EFO, Fire Marshal  

Tufts University

 

While improved on-campus fire and life safety policies and programs at most U.S. higher educational institutions have resulted in much safer student residential environments, the fire safety features of off-campus housing environments continue in many cases, to remain outside of the influence of campus fire safety policies or oversight. The decision by students to rent off-campus housing was made with very little consideration from the fire and life safety viewpoint; and the safety of the students suffers as a result. In fact, social factors and proximity to the campus are frequently the dominant reasons for off campus residential selection by the students.

 

Campus fire safety leaders are certainly aware of the many factors that influence the fire and life safety of off-campus living, but often have very limited influence beyond the campus boundaries. The tactical approach described in this new program includes building a partnership (through early and repeated educational outreach) with the parents of students to enlist the parents as Influencers in the process of selecting off-campus student housing.

 

Tufts University ‘s Department of Public and Environmental Safety / Fire Safety Office (FSO), using lessons learned from this process, has transitioned to a new approach to influence the fire and life safety aspects of off-campus living for our students. This program is very low cost (information is shared via electronic format by email) yet has a potentially high value of lives and property protected while also promoting good will between all stakeholders related to this topic. Additionally, this program provides “added value” for the institution and specifically promotes the value of investment related to fire safety office funding.

Attendees will engage in targeted discussion of the challenges related to improving off campus fire and life safety to housing environments traditionally beyond the influence of campus fire safety officials or policies.

 

Learning outcomes:

1. Attendees will be presented with the concept of early interaction with parents (and their student offspring) that opens a pathway to partnership with the fire safety office. The partnership is rooted in the shared goals of the FSO (higher educational institution), the parents, and subsequently – the student. The goal is to keep the student safe (always) especially in the approaching move to an off campus living environment.

2. Attendees will be provided with resources (ideas, inspiration, and the guidance document titled: “Fire Safety Guide for Off-Campus Residence Selection”. These resources not only benefit the FSO teams, but will in turn generate appreciation and good will from parents and students when the Guides are distributed from the attendee’s home institution FSO.

3. The attendees will learn that adopting these “tactical alternatives” to their approach to the challenges of off campus fire safety effectiveness also bring ADDED VALUE to the role of the FSO within the institution. Building partnerships with parents and students through a sincere and thoughtful process to keep the student safe (even when living off campus) generates good will and demonstrates that funding the operation and staffing of the FSO is a wise investment with invaluable return potential.

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004 - An Executive Fire Officer Applied Research Project: Preventing Bathroom Exhaust Fan Fires

Presented by: Fire Chief Brian Miller
Westerville Division of Fire

 

Nationwide data is showing an increase in the number of bathroom exhaust fan fires. The purpose of this presentation is to discuss applied research and to identify the reasons bathroom exhaust fan fires occur and how they can be prevented in the communities such as yours.

 

The research posed various questions: (a.) What events lead up to a bathroom exhaust fan starting a fire? (b.) What maintenance and installation procedures should be performed to prevent these fans from starting fires? (c.) What type of fire prevention program should be created and delivered to educate the public on preventing bathroom fan fires.

 

Surveys were created to address bathroom exhaust fan installation, fire causes, and fire prevention for fire departments and electricians. Forensic Electrical Engineers and a Code Enforcement Supervisor were also interviewed.

 

This presentation will review the EFO abstract and look in depth into this research project and share our findings and recommendations of this applied research project.

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005 - How to Conduct a Fire Evacuation Analysis

Presented by: J. Reichert, Assistant Professor, Fire Protection and Paramedicine Sciences
Eastern Kentucky University

 

Whether it is a new, renovated, or existing building, an egress analysis is an important way to

determine any egress issues prior to an emergency. The ability to adequately conduct an egress

analysis should be in the tool box for any safety professional on a university campus. This

knowledge requires the professional to have adequate knowledge of the different stages of

egress and how fire characteristics, human characteristics, and building characteristics can have

an effect on each.

 

This program will guide the audience through the 4 different stages of egress (time to detection, time to notification, pre-movement time, and movement time) and how to find resources or how to calculate each.

 

Once all stages have been determined, and overall time to evacuate can be

known and this is known as the Required Safe Evacuation Time (RSET).

This program will also discuss:

• Fire scenarios expected to be seen in University Buildings based on historical data.

• Human characteristics that will determine how quickly a person decides to evacuate and

decisions that may be made along the way.

• Building characteristics such as, but not limited to, door and stair widths, different alarm

systems, available egress paths, and exit locations.

 

Learning outcomes:

Upon completion of this presentation, students should be able to:

1. Identify relevant fire scenarios expected on a University Campus based on historical

research

2. Find relevant data needed to calculate the RSET for any building

3. Determine which human characteristics may play a role in a given building

4. Determine how different building characteristics can effect evacuation

5. Calculate RSET times for different buildings and scenarios

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006 - Understanding Mass Notification Systems
Implementing Mass Notification Technologies in Compliance with NFPA 72

Presented by: Eric Murphy, Regional Account Manager

Alertus Technologies

 

As the mass notification system market evolves and expands, many fire alarm system designers and emergency mass notification system providers have started integrating fire alarms with security and mass notification systems. This allows organizations to leverage existing fire panels to expand their emergency communication efforts in the event of an emergency. This presentation will discuss best practices in implementing mass notification technologies to ensure compliance with NFPA 72, Chapter 24.

 

Learning Outcomes:

1. Participants will understand the challenges and solutions facing organizations that seek a comprehensive emergency notification system

2. Participants will learn about the different mass notification system codes and mandates, specifically NFPA 72

3. Participants will learn best practices in implementing mass notification technologies that meet the necessary codes and mandates

4. Participants will learn about fire alarm control panel integration with a mass notification system and the role it plays in providing comprehensive emergency notification coverage

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009 - Fire Safety During High Profile Events: Crowds, Security, and ‘What did you just ask for?
Presented by: Gregg Black, Assistant Director of Fire Safety

George Mason University

 

This presentation will cover lessons learned and best practices in managing short notice political events with large crowds and high-ranking governmental officials. There is a balance between safety, security, event requests, and limitations of the facility that should be considered to ensure a safe but successful event.

 

George Mason University has hosted seven events with potential, former, or present United States Presidents / Vice Presidents, one event with six out of eight Supreme Court Justices, and one event with the Security of Education. All of these events required complex planning especially if the guest or their topic is controversial. Planning for these events is further complicated by the short planning time frame, often less than 72-hours, from when the event is scheduled to when it begins. These events are highly publicized and often one oversight can shed a negative light on the university. This presentation will cover some of the challenges, pitfalls, and success that Mason has experienced while hosting large political events. Attendees will be able to hear firsthand about the strategies and solutions that made these events a success.

 

Learning outcomes:

1. Learn the relationship between the various entities (campaigns, security, University, and Fire Code Officials) that participate in the event.

2. Learn strategies to prevent serious issues from arising at the last minute.

3. Learn how to integrate of fire safety functions with planning and security operations.

4. Learn creative solutions for “must have” conditions that increase hazard to building or occupants.

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012 - Mass Timber Fire Safety – Myths and Misconceptions for this New Construction Type
Presented by: David Barber
ARUP - Fire Engineering Consultants

 

Colleges, Universities, and Industry are leading the way in developing buildings that provide very high sustainability credentials and are also innovative. Mass timber construction and the use of cross laminated timber (CLT) is being used for new university developments and this new form of construction has many code officials and fire departments scratching their heads about fire safety.

This presentation provides an introduction to mass timber buildings and CLT. CLT is a building product that has over 30 years of use globally, but less than five years use in the US. Architects are starting to specify CLT for low, medium and high-rise buildings in the US. As a new product, there has been misinformation regarding CLT’s behavior in fire, both positive and negative. Building officials and fire department personnel do not have the tools and information they need to understand what is fact and what is a myth, with regard to the fire performance.

This presentation will introduce why CLT is a popular building element globally and will explore a number of misconception and myths regarding CLT and its performance in fire. The strengths and weaknesses of CLT as a building element will be shown. The aim of the session is to provide fact-based information on this new form of construction that will assist building officials, fire fighters and fire protection engineers.

1.      Understand how CLT is being used as a building element, for floors and walls, with high rise buildings using CLT for the primary structure and is achieving code compliant fire resistance ratings

2.      Learn about the fire test data that is available for CLT, including floor and wall fire ratings and connection solutions, with the fire testing carried out in the US.

3.      The term “delamination” is associated with CLT and fire exposure. Learn what delamination is, how the failure mechanism works and how this can be resolved for building construction.

4.      Learn about the issue called “second flashover”, which is sometimes associated with CLT construction. What is this and why is it important? What allows it to occur and how it can be prevented?

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014. Changes to the 2018 ICC and NFPA Models Codes
Presented by:
Richard Roberts, Industry Affairs Manager
Honeywell Security and Fire

 

This presentation is an informative discussion that provides an overview of the new requirements for emergency voice alarm communication (EVAC) systems, carbon monoxide (CO) detection systems, visible notification appliances, mass notification and integrated (end-to-end) testing of fire alarm systems with other life safety systems in the 2018 edition of the International Code Council (ICC) and National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) model codes.

2018 I-Code Changes:

International Fire Code (IFC)

International Building Code (IBC)

International Existing Building Code (IEBC)

 

2018 NFPA Code Changes:

NFPA 101

NFPA 1

NFPA 101

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015. Fire Department Operations in High-Rise and Large-Area Structures

Presented by: Lt. Brad French

Dayton Fire Department

Board of Directors - International Society of Fire Service Instructors

 

Do your fire companies really know the buildings in their first-due district?  Various concepts of fire protection systems, some of which can be quite complicated or intimidating, and brought down "to the street" for firefighters and company officers.  Significant knowledge of standpipe and sprinkler systems, fire pumps, elevators, fire alarm control panels, smoke control systems, and other building safety features is often reserved for fire prevention or code enforcement personnel. 

 

Attendees will gain an understanding of complex fire protection system components that will enable them to apply the easy-to-remember principles on working incidents.  Attendees are also guided in developing a realistic and engaging company-level pre-incident planning program.  Case studies involving line-of-duty deaths and high-dollar-loss fires that occurred in buildings despite fire protection systems being in place are also examined.

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016.  A “Top 10” list for AHJ’s, Inspectors, Code Officials - NFPA 96 & ANSI C-10 Code Review
Presented by: is Randy Conforti and Jim Roberts
Precision Kleen, Inc. and Derby Services

 

This top 10 list will outline the important areas all code officials should use during routine inspections, the topics will cover, Fire protection, Specialty Equipment, Exhaust Fans, Duct work, Exhaust Hoods, Cooking Equipment, New/existing construction, Proper Documentation and the Service Provider

 

Learning Outcomes:
We will improve defining code requirements, define common problems found in eating & drinking establishments, reduce the risk of fire and property loss, provide a greater awareness of current industry issues.

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018 - Effectively Communicating Active Shooter Response Training in a Campus Environment
Presented by:
Seán P. Fay, CEM

Operations and Emergency Services - Kentucky Community and Technical College System

 

While there are many teaching modalities and platforms for training professional responders how to respond in, or to, active shooter situations, many of the programs designed for civilian audiences are either too technical, too tactical, or just too graphic to leave your campus audience pleased that they attended the training. A successful presentation leaves the participants concerned but not frightened, thoughtful but not overwhelmed, and confident that they are better prepared for having attended.  

 

When an audience member is pleased that they attended the training, they recommend it to their peers, their friends, and most importantly, their bosses. The boss then schedules a time for all their employees to receive the training, thus maximizing the reach of your successive presentations. This seminar demonstrates and discusses some best campus audience communications practices as well as common pitfalls (and potentially career-ending mistakes) when communicating life safety classes in the always sensitive, frequently over-analyzed campus environment.

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019 - You Can Hear Me, But Do You Understand??

Reaching the International Student and Members of Your Community so Language Barriers Do NOT Stop Your “Fire Prevention and Safety”

Presented by: Jim Patton, Fire Marshal

Oregon State University

 

With almost a million international students attending colleges & universities in the US, and more and more local communities are being faced with language barriers every day, it has become increasingly important to ensure fire and safety professionals are finding ways to effectively reach this at risk population with their safety messaging.  Speaking English louder and slower is not going to do the trick!  During this presentation participants will learn how to identify and reach those language barriers in ways that are more effective and meaningful.  Key fire safety messaging will be discussed.  Different forms of learning will be presented and discussed.  Examples of how we attempt to reach our international and non-English speaking population in and around Oregon State University will be presented and an opportunity for info sharing will be provided at the end of the presentation.  By the conclusion of this training participants will be better prepared to identify and reach this at-risk population, create applicable and effective fire safety messages and deliver them in a more meaningful manner.

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020. Fire Protection Challenges of Rooftop Solar Panels

Presented by: Patric E. McCon, CSP, CFPS, CHMM

Zurich North America - Insurance and Risk Management

 

Photovoltaic (PV) solar panels are a popular alternative energy source today. Solar Panels convert the energy of the sun into electricity and are an attractive option for companies looking to reduce both their energy cost and their impact to the environment. What’s more, the cost of installation is dropping and tax incentives are encouraging organizations to reduce their carbon footprint. However, we’re still learning about risks – to the building and to responding firefighters - that may occur when a PV system is installed on the roof of a building

Learning outcomes:

1. Describe the increased fire hazards introduced by roof-mounted solar panels.

2. Describe the hazards to firefighters introduced by roof-mounted solar panels and solar panels in storage.

3.0 Describe the decision-making process involved in deciding whether to mount an offensive or defensive operation when a building with roof-mounted solar panels is involved in a fire.

4.0 Describe the advantages of mounting solar panels on the ground instead of on the roof.

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021 Fire Protection During Construction

Presented by: Rob Neale, Vice President, National Fire Service Activities

International Code Council

 

Recent high-profile "mega-fires" in residential and commercial buildings under construction has prompted a national discussion among the fire service, product manufacturers, developers and construction managers about means to prevent them. Some of the proposals include dramatic changes to the building codes that might increase costs and lessen design options. From the fire code enforcement perspective, the solutions already exist in the codes and standards, the important issue is to educate the appropriate target audience to effect meaningful change.

 

Fires during construction occur when the structure is most vulnerable: fire protection systems and equipment may not be in place, fire resistive constriction and opening protectives may not be complete, and a huge variety of flammable and combustible materials has accumulated on a job site.

 

While unwanted fires during construction are statistically rare, aggressive and worldwide web-speed news coverage and social media sharing result in disproportionate public awareness.  These events put fire fighters and neighborhoods at risk, stretch fire, building and water departments to their limits, disrupt traffic and other infrastructure and compel people to ask if combustible construction is safe.  Some jurisdictions are discussing banning wood construction, which would have a huge impact on affordable housing and jobs.

 

The International Fire Code® and National Fire Protection Association 241 “Standard for Safeguarding Construction, Alternation and Demolition Operations” provide prescriptive-based regulations to protect building during these susceptible periods.  The international Coalition for Construction Fire Safety has been founded to address this issue.

 

Learning outcomes:

1. Identify recent major fires and their reported causes and impacts

2. Evaluate the many fire-related hazards that exist on a construction site

3. Identify the ICC and NFPA requirements for fire protection safeguards during construction

4. Describe solutions for simple fire safety strategies

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023 - Short term property rentals of 4 bedrooms or less advertised on websites like Airbnb.com and VRBO.com
Presented by: Mike Canfora, Fire Inspector
City of Massillon, Ohio

 

Companies like Airbnb.com and VRBO (Vacation Rentals by Owner) have managed to get people to refer to them as pioneers of the “sharing economy”.  A deceptive slight-of-hand given that they are in business making money for renting (sharing for a price?) rooms.  The focus of this one hour presentation is to educate fire prevention bureaus, code enforcement and building officials, and local tax departments as to what I found within my own jurisdiction upon discovering their existence.  ALL of the properties within my jurisdiction were violating some combination of fire code, building code, 1, 2, 3-family dwelling housing code, or local ordinances.  I found that many surrounding fire prevention bureaus as well as my own building and code enforcement offices didn’t even know that these were in operation both within the city and throughout the county.  The model codes provided a framework and I found that good, clearly defined local ordinance(s) as the best way to regulate these businesses. 

 

Learning outcomes:

1. What websites like Airbnb.com and VRBO.com are doing and why we should be concerned

2. Applying fire, building, and housing code to these businesses

3. The “variety” of properties being rented out

4. Updating or developing local ordinance to regulate these businesses

5. The potential dangers of these properties to a community

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024 - Every Bear Goes Home

Presented by: Kristin Tucker Tinney, Managing Director
Every Bear Goes Home

 

Does your campus community have problems with excessive alcohol and drug use?  Is this unsafe party culture sending students to the Emergency Room or worse, the morgue?  This is happening in the college community in which I work, and as an on-line firefighter/paramedic, this is what I did to combat this epidemic. 

  .

Every Bear Goes Home is an educational program for the students of the University of California, Berkeley.  I run Every Bear Goes Home, flanked by my amazing team of fellow firefighter/paramedics.  We go to fraternities and sororities and conduct safety presentations that include topics of alcohol and drug education, as well as fire and life safety.  We interact with the students on a more personal level in a controlled and safe environment.  They meet the men and women of the Berkeley Fire Department who will be responding to help them when they call 911. 

  .

The students have responded positively to the program, have improved their party behavior, which has been reflected in the college party culture.  Do you want to do this in YOUR college community?  It is possible, and we can help you get started by sharing ideas experiences with you.  Our students' lives are on the line, and we must do our part to protect them.  I truly believe that Every Bear Goes Home is doing just that. 

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025 - Improving Fire Safety Preparedness in Study Abroad

Presented by: Tom Hayden and Sarah Blanc

Jasmine Jahanshahi Fire Safety Foundation

 

Safety is a top priority in study abroad pre-departure sessions, but fire safety has received relatively little attention. Learn about a fatal fire abroad that killed four international students and critically injured many more, provoking the presenters to start the Fire Safety Foundation. Through discussion and a video presentation, discover their central mission: protect students in the US and abroad from preventable fire-related death and injury through direct education, sharing technology, and partnerships with universities.

 

What is the role of safety and security offices at universities across the U.S. and how can they perform inspections and training to ensure the safety of those occupying campus buildings and residences at home and abroad? What tools can we leverage stateside to ensure student safety abroad? How can fire safety experts and study abroad coordinators work together to make this issue relevant to students? The Foundation will present its mission, history, and student-friendly resources along with a video detailing their story. Questions and audience discussion will close the session.

 

Learning outcomes:

1. The differences between fire safety standards in the United States and abroad

2. How universities can ensure that they send their students to fire safe housing abroad

3. How universities can train students to be prepared for fire-related emergencies abroad

4. What tools the Foundation offers for students and universities

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026 - One Bite at a Time; Breaking Down Complex Emergency Preparedness Exercises into Bite Sized Pieces

Presented by: Marc Burdiss serves as the Director of The Office of Emergency Management

Northern Arizona University

 

Go Big or Go Home is an attitude all too often taken by those tasked with designing emergency preparedness exercises; and more often than not it leads to failures in accomplishing the needed. This presentation will share lessons learned from designing, facilitating, and evaluating exercises and how anyone can break them down into more manageable and effective, smaller exercises. This presentation will also share the value of limiting scope and objective creep, thinking outside the box, as well as gleaning after action reports to generate exercise priorities.

 

In closing, we will discuss how this concept was used effectively at this university in 2015 to prepare for an incident that actually occurred.

 

Presentation objectives:

1. Share how clearly defining scope and objectives can guide a exercise project to more

effectively achieve a successful outcome.

2. Describe the need to step back from the larger, more complex , and media appealing

exercises and focus on truly creating or testing plans and procedures.

3. Identify unconventional approaches to select priorities and objectives to craft an exercise

that reveals capability gaps and deficiencies.

  

Learning outcomes:

1.Attendees will learn what approaches to exercises work best for given objectives based

on experience and lessons learned.

2.Attendees will learn how to create an exercise program that will increase resilience and

capabilities to better prepare for an emergency.

3. Attendees will learn how large exercises often contradict or inhibit the close ties and

collaborative working environments they are striving for.

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027 - Setting Up ICS (Incident Command System) for Large and Small Scale Special Events

Presented by: Matthew P. Shannon, Fire and Life Safety Manager

Kennesaw State University

 

This presentation will demonstrate and discuss the importance of using the Incident Command Structure and System before and during small-large scale events on campus. We will also go into detail on how to set up an incident command structure, an incident action plan, and proper staffing for all events. We will also discuss in great detail effectively conducting a fire watch during large scale and large assembly events.

 

Learning outcomes:

1.Importance of using Incident Command System

2. ICS Overview

3. Incident Action Plan (IAP)

4. Properly Staffing your Events

5. County/State/Local AHJ

6. Understanding a Fire Watch

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030 - Effective training programs for Resident Advisors and Students living in Off-Campus Housing
Stop and Knock on their front door – Make your Resident Advisors “Movie Stars”. Entertaining, proven and highly effective methods to deliver fire safety information to students.

Presented by: Gerald Drumheller, UVA Fire Marshal and Training Coordinator

University of Virginia

 

Want to get the attention of today’s college student; use the highly successful “Stop and Knock” campaign to bring fire safety to the front door of students living in off-campus housing. Show them video of their fellow students escaping from the burning home in a popular off-campus neighborhood, the loss of all of their material items and then make your Resident Advisors “Movie Stars” by allowing them to assist you in bringing effective and fun filled presentations to promote fire safety to students that live in your resident halls. 

Following a major house fire inhabited by 13 UVA students, the University’s Fire Safety office along with the Charlottesville Fire Department (CFD) and the Charlottesville Neighborhood Development Services began the annual "Stop and Knock" program. "Stop and Knock" involves University Fire Safety Officers, City firefighters and property maintenance inspectors going door to door through off-campus areas with high concentrations of student residents, delivering fire safety information and useful tips, property maintenance issues and other general safety messages.

The presentation will feature a video of the actual house fire showing the students involved, the actual 911 call when a student member of the home informs the operator that there may still be students trapped inside, the damage to their home, cars, etc. Hear the students describe their harrowing experience as well as comments from the Deputy Chief of the Charlottesville Fire Department.

Second half of the presentation will focus on unique ways of involving senior RA leadership in assisting with an effective and wildly popular fire safety training program. We produce video skits featuring members of the RA leadership team along with the Charlottesville Fire Department (CFD). Skits feature microwave fires, smoked filled hallways, students in turn out gear fighting fires, rescuing fellow students, encountering obstacles in halls while trying to evacuate, explaining safety tips, etc. Videos are then placed in a power point presentation which also entails humorous pics etc.

The presentation will also address our “Courtesy Inspection Program, Fire Drills, other training programs as well as the positive communication and interaction we have with students throughout the year.

 

Learning outcomes:

1. Discuss many ways to engage student resident advisors in fire safety training programs.

2. Discuss how to engage local fire department in resident hall fire safety training programs.

3. Identify and discuss strategies for establishing good working relationships with resident advisors and students through training and non-punitive inspections.

4. Identify opportunities to engage other local fire safety partners (fire department, property maintenance inspectors, local media, etc.) in the development and implementation of an off-campus fire safety program.

5. Identify and discuss strategies for developing website materials focused on fire safety for off campus residents.

6. Recognize and identify opportunities to formulate relationships with other student organizations and local entities. Allow the success and recognition of your training programs to “open doors” to other segments of your campus activities.

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031 - FireCARES- Using Big Data to Make Your Community Safer
Tyler Buffington, Graduate Student
University of Texas at Austin

 

Fire department resources should be deployed to match the risk levels inherent to hazards in the community to ensure that the community is less vulnerable to negative outcomes in firefighter injury and death, civilian injury and death and property loss. The Fire-Community Assessment Response Evaluation System (FireCARES) is an open-source, cloud-based, big-data analytics framework for analyzing fire service and emergency medical service activities.  FireCARES analyzes massive amounts of fire department and community data, including building footprints, census reports, and other data sets (e.g., survey data) to identify whether resources are appropriately deployed to match a community's risk level. In this presentation, attendees will learn about the data and models used in FireCARES, how to access and use FireCARES, and the vision of FireCARES to promote fire safety in a variety of communities, including campus environments.  Attendees will leave with an understanding of how available data "tell the story" of a fire department in regard to its risk environment.

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034 - Fire Sprinkler (heads) 101 – New Technology in Fire Protection
Presented by: Bryan Berkley
Viking Corporation

 

Whether it’s Inspecting, designing, installing fire sprinklers in a new building or the need to replace existing sprinklers, it is very important to understand the different fire sprinkler types. The form and shape, as well as the use and purpose, differs among sprinkler head types. Knowing about the sprinkler and what is required is important.

Once you've selected a sprinkler type, additional options become available including temperature, finish, and response type. While we will address these options, it is important to know that each type of fire sprinkler meets a different need so therefore getting the right sprinkler (head) is paramount.

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035 - Special Events Risk Assessments: Understanding the Basics
Presented by: Richard Morman - Retired Assistant Police Chief - The Ohio State University

 

Special Events are by their very nature not "routine operations" but are often modified or new processes and procedures used to support a "one time activity". Given that these "special" activities are not routine, the exposure to risk is increased.

Basic values exposed to risk include: personnel, property, liability (responsibility for injury or damage to others), continuity and revenue. Accidents can involve injury or property damage resulting in financial loss, reputational loss, interruption or cancellation of the activity, additional expenses, etc.

The primary responsibility of the individuals "in charge" of a special event include managing the risks of the activities, participants, operations, personnel and property to support the successful outcome.

 

 Attendees will gain an understanding of:

1.     The risk management framework

2.     How to identify personnel and resources needed to conduct a risk assessment

3.     How to estimate risk

4.     How to determine the priority of known risks   

______________________    

  .

039 - NFPA 72 - 2016 Edition Update

Presented by: Tom Hammerberg
The Automatic Fire Alarm Association (AFAA)

 

NFPA 72 - The National Fire Alarm and Signaling Code has changed.  Are you prepared for the changes coming to NFPA72- 2016? This workshop reviews the significant changes made to the latest edition NFPA 72.Being up-to-date with basics of the National Fire Alarm and Signaling Code® (NFPA 72) will help improve your fire alarm knowledge.

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040 - NFPA 25 - The 2014 Updates
Presented by: Jason Webb
National Fire Sprinkler Association (NFSA)

 

Nearly every jurisdiction in the US has a significant investment in the proven reliability of fire sprinklers. NFPA 25, the Standard for the Inspection, Testing, and Maintenance of Water-Based Fire Protection Systems, was developed to help ensure that high degree of reliability. The standard is referenced in all model building and fire codes and adopted as a stand-alone requirement in many states. The 2014 edition has several important changes that effect how the standard is applied and enforced. This seminar is designed as a refresher on the purpose and scope of NFPA 25, the roles and responsibilities it assigns and its documentation requirements.  Significant changes seen in the 2014 edition will be discussed along with some topics being currently debated for the next edition

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041 - Fire Alarm Certification Program

Tom Presnak, Lead Engineering Associate

Underwriters’ Laboratories (UL) - Fire Alarm Certification Group

 

Fire officials verify that fire alarm systems are installed per applicable code requirements. However, once these systems are installed it is a challenge for many jurisdictions to ensure they continue to comply with code requirements.

The UL fire alarm certificate program is designed to make sure that systems will continue to be tested and maintained after their initial system acceptance, and at no additional cost to the jurisdiction.

 

Fire codes require some fire alarm systems to be monitored by an approved supervising station in accordance with NFPA 72, and fire officials often require these systems to be monitored by a UL Listed facility which is consistent with NFPA 72. However, merely requiring the fire alarms systems to be monitored by a listed facility does not mean the central station will provide all of the NFPA 72 required elements for central station service.

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300 Series - Sponsored and Presented by Telgian

 

 

 

101 – Overview of Fire Alarm Systems
Presented by Tom Parrish
Telgian

 

Fire alarm systems has several devices working together to detect and warn people through visual and audio appliances when smoke, fire, carbon monoxide or other emergencies are present. These alarms may be activated automatically from smoke detectors, and heat detectors or may also be activated via manual fire alarm activation devices such as manual call points or pull stations.

Fire alarm systems are essential for the adequate detection and warning of a fire situation within commercial and residential premises. The detection, visual and audible requirements of a fire alarm system are dependent on the layout and use of the building. It is due to the diversity of these applications that fire alarm panels and related accessories have been developed to meet these varying needs.

______________________    

 

103 – In-Building Radio Systems / Two way Radio Systems
Presented by Mark Chubb

Telgian


Have you ever walked into a building and noticed you have "no bars" on your cell phone? Radio frequency (both radio and cellular) signals are greatly reduced when passed through dense building materials such as concrete and metal. This problem was evident during 9/11, when first responders were not able to effectively communicate inside the World Trade Center towers. Since 2009, the International Code Council and the National Fire Protection Association have added first responder radio coverage requirements to their book of fire codes. Many states and municipalities have begun enforcing these codes.

Based upon Model Fire and Building Codes: all new and some existing buildings shall have approved radio coverage for emergency responders within the building based upon the existing coverage levels of the public safety communication systems of the jurisdiction at the exterior of the building. The intent of this guideline is to provide the occupants of the minimum standards necessary to meet the requirements for emergency responder radio coverage in accordance with the state code.

______________________    

 

104 – NFPA 25 Misunderstood, Misinterpreted, and Misapplied
Presented by Russ Leavitt

Telgian

   .
NFPA 25 Standard for the Inspection, Testing, and Maintenance of Water-based Fire Protection Systems is referenced by all water-based system installation standards (Including the Ohio Fire Code and the IFC) and is widely adopted throughout the United States.  However, the scope and purpose of the standard are widely misunderstood and its application widely misapplied.  NFPA 25 is intended to eliminate system failures that are the result of lack of maintenance. Therefore the focus of the inspections and tests required by the standard do not address the design status of the system or compliance to installation standards.  Attendees of this session will learn the reasons behind this limited scope and how the inspections and tests are geared to meet these limits.  In addition, the roles of the AHJ, the property owner, and the service provider will be reviewed to examine how the stakeholders are intended to work together to meet the purpose of NFPA 25.

______________________    

 

105 – Applying the 3 E’s to Exiting
Presented by Warren Burns

Telgian


Often fire and life safety professionals refer to “The Three E’s” – Engineering, Enforcement and Education – in providing fire and life safety in an occupancy. Exiting is a perfect example of how the three E’s work together to provide occupant safety.

• Engineering – Building codes describe the number, width and arrangements of exits. They also address corridors, signs, opening force, type of lock or latch… all aspect of the egress system. Knowing what is required is an essential first step in providing safe, adequate exiting.

• Enforcement – Are aisle and corridors kept clear? Do doors operate as designed? Is lighting adequate to escape during a power failure? Ensuring the maintenance of all elements of the egress system is critical in maintaining the engineered abilities.
• Education – Are occupants familiar with the building, or transient attendees? Are signs adequate? For living quarters, are exiting drills held on a regular basis?

Learning outcomes:

Participants will have been introduced to the following:
1. Methods for determining the adequacy of exiting
2. Strategies for maintaining the functionality of the egress system
3. The importance of exiting education, including regular drills

______________________    

 

106 – NFPA 25 and 72: Compliance Need Not Break the Bank
Presented by: Russ Leavitt
Telgian

 

The cost effective maintenance of fire and life safety systems is always a challenge but even more so in a down economy that is filled with corporative directives to lower costs. This seminar examines the published requirements for the inspection, testing, and maintenance for fire suppression and fire alarm systems along with strategies for complying with the requirements without busting the bank. The session reviews real world examples where property owners, authorities having jurisdiction, and service providers work together to manage the risk of fire loss while keeping the costs as low as possible.

______________________    

 

107 – Stationary Fire Pumps 100- Installation and Maintenance Basics
Presented by: Mark Chubb
Telgian

 

Many buildings around the country including many college and university campuses their are water-based fire protection systems utilizing stationary fire pumps. The failure of a fire pump almost always results in the failure of the fire protection system it supplies. Where fire pumps are utilized with fire protection systems the proper installation and maintenance of this critical system component is essential for successful system operation. This seminar reviews the basic hydraulic principles associated with fire pumps and the general requirements for pump and driver selection, installation, and maintenance using the latest editions of NFPA 20 and NFPA 25. This session will benefit both the novice and experienced fire pump owners, installers, and maintainers.

______________________    

 

200 Series - UL Firefighter Safety and Wellness Symposium

 

 
  .

201 - Core Concepts of Fire Fighting

Presented by: Peter Van Dorpe, Retired - Director of the Chicago Fire Department’s Training Division
Advisory Board for Underwriters Laboratories’ Firefighter Safety Research Institute

______________________  

 ...

202 - Overview of FSRI Research Projects

Presented by: Lt. Brad French

Dayton Fire Department

Board of Directors - International Society of Fire Service Instructors

 

This presentation will present an overview of fire dynamics research spanning the past 20 years.  While many members of the fire service talk about all of the "new" research and operational concepts, the simple truth of that matter is that much of what are considered "modern" findings have been identified over the span of many years by a number of key organizations.  Research history and fire dynamics projects from Underwriter's Laboratories (UL), the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), the International Society of Fire Service Instructors (ISFSI), and the Federal Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, and Firearms (ATF) will be discussed.  Participants will leave with a more well-rounded history of how the "modern" fire dynamics discussion across the nation came to be.

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  ..

203 - Changing the Culture of the Fireground from the Ground Up

Presented by: Lt. Scott Rupp, Training and Special Operations Bureau
Springfield Division of Fire (Ohio)

  .

This session will look at methods the members of Springfield Professional Firefighters, have taken to change our fire ground culture at the street level. We will look at the
socioeconomic impact on the city and how its impacted the fire department’s ability to fund continuous training for its members. I’ll discuss the process we used to bring the research to
Springfield and the methods we’ve used to get the information onto the streets and how we intend to formalize our tactics at the Ground Level.

______________________  

  . ..

204 - Firefighter Exposure and Cancer Research

Presented by: Kenny Fent, Research Industrial Hygienist

National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health  - NIOSH

  ..

The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) has conducted recent studies aimed at understanding the risk of cancer and exposure to carcinogens in the U.S. Fire Service. In this presentation, Dr. Kenny Fent will provide an overview of the NIOSH cancer cohort study and his work with Illinois Fire Service Institute and UL’s Firefighter Safety Research Institute focused on cardiovascular and carcinogenic risks during modern structural firefighting. Dr. Fent will also discuss recent findings related to contamination control.

______________________    

 .   .

205 Control Interventions, Tactical Considerations

Presented by: Gavin Horn

Illinois Fire Service Institute

  .

The Illinois Fire Service Institute has led a series of trailblazing projects with UL’s Firefighter Safety Research Institute and the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health to study the cardiovascular and chemical exposure risks on today’s fireground.  This session will guide you through some key lessons-learned from this project that focus on the firefighter’s thermal response to firefighting activities in residential structure fires. In particular, we will discuss the impact of different fireground job assignments as well as suppression tactics.

______________________  

  ....

206 - Apparatus Inspections: A Path to Firefighter Safety

Presented by: Jim Johannessen, Lead Engineering Associate
Underwriters’ Laboratories (UL) - Fire Equipment Services Group

______________________  

  ..

207 - Ensuring Occupant and Fire Fighter Safety Through Building Inspection Programs

Presented by: Michael Halligan

Underwriters’ Laboratories (UL) - Building Inspection Services Group

 

______________________ 

 

300 Series - Sponsored and Presented by Jensen Hughes

 

301 - Understanding What Codes Apply to Fire Alarm Systems (Ohio) -
Changes to fire alarm requirements in the new Ohio Building Code

Presented by: Jeffrey Moore, PE, FSFPE, Senior Fire Protection Engineer
Jensen Hughes

 .

Fire detection, alarm and signaling systems play a significant role in property fire protection and early warning. That role can be one of an upfront starring actor, or it might be more of a supporting role. Either way when an alarm system is installed, it must be installed properly.   Building codes establish when a system must be installed as well as some of the operational parameters.

   .

Ohio adopted a new version of the International Building Code (OBC) with Ohio amendments effective 11/1/2017. This change brought with it changes to the requirements for fire alarm systems as the OBC reference for fire alarm system requirements changed from the 2010 Edition of NFPA 72 to the 2016 Edition of NFPA 72. This presentation focuses on the significant changes affecting fire alarm systems under the new Ohio Building Code.

______________________  

 

302 - Understanding Smoke Control Systems

Presented by: Adam Edwards, PE, Director, Business Development Southeast

Jensen Hughes

 

This presentation provides a brief overview of smoke control systems and components, followed by discussion on acceptance and commissioning of such systems. The focus will be placed on specific areas that can benefit architects, design teams, and CA services. Focusing on the requirements in the IBC, NFPA 92, and Handbook of Smoke Control Engineering, the class went over the purposes of smoke control systems, types of smoke control systems and their applications, calculation methods in determining smoke control exhaust and supply capacities, special inspections, and resources for the 3rd party reviewer

______________________   

 

305 - Purposefully Delayed Fire Alarm Notification
Presented by: Larry Rietz, SET
Jensen Hughes

 

Often an owner has a strong desire not to activate fire alarm notification in their facility so as to not needlessly disturb facility operations and occupants.  This presentation details the Code-approved options for delaying the activation of fire alarm notification.  These options include automatic notification, pre-signal notification, positive alarm sequence, and detector cross-zoning.  This presentation will discuss the code requirements for each option and the critical considerations for an owner and designer, as well as the authority having jurisdiction who must approve these unique options.

 

Learning outcomes:
1. Why would an owner wish to delay or prevent fire alarm notification activation?
2. What are the three Code-allowed options for delaying the activation of notification?
3. What are the specific Code requirements and critical considerations when considering delaying notification activation?
4. When should fire alarm activation never be delayed?

______________________   

 

306 - Understanding Risk Analysis and Emergency Planning and Their Impact on Emergency Communications Systems Design

Presented by: Timothy LaRose, PE, Vice President of Development, Education
Jensen Hughes

  .  

This is a 2-hour program.

The New IBC and NFPA Codes will now require a Risk Analysis for all Mass Notification Systems designs and installations. NFPA 72-2016 Chapter 24 contains specific requirements for using a risk analysis and the building emergency plan to ensure that the emergency communications system is designed to meet all of the owner’s mass notification system goals. This presentation will provide designers and installers assistance in understanding risk analysis and emergency plan concepts and how to ensure that their mass notification systems (MNS) design is Code compliant and meets all stated MNS goals.

______________________    

 

308 - Structural Hazards of Overhead Solar Panels to Responding Fire Fighters
Presented by: Warren Bonisch, P.E., Vice President

Jensen Hughes

 

A proposal was made to a city fire dept. to retroactively add solar panels on the top of a 4-level public parking garage. Thru the 3rd party technical assistance provisions of the fire code, Jensen Hughes was hired to identify, analyze and recommend improvements to the project that would reduce the risk to the responding fire fighters.

 

The primary risk identified by the fire marshal being the potential structural failure of the solar panel system due to the fire exposure from one or more vehicle fires. Analysis of the applicable building and fire codes, review of available technical literature (including UL published fire test data on solar panel systems), detailed structural system review, and computer fire modeling of the various fire scenarios, the predicted fire exposures and its impact on the structural system, etc. were done, in conjunction with detailed technical discussions with the fire department, to enhance the projects design and installation to the satisfaction of the responding fire department.

Learning outcomes:

1. Learn how a major city fire dept. approached this unusual project and their concerns.

2. How the building and fire codes provisions addressed/did not address the overhead solar panel installation.

3. Learn about the technical methods followed to identify and quantify the risks associated with the overhead solar panel system.

4. Learn how the overhead solar panel system is predicted to react to a fire exposure from below. How the risks were mitigated in the design of the overhead solar panel system.

 ______________________     ______________________     ______________________     ______________________ 

 

Programs with this symbol signify approval with the American Council of Engineering Companies (ACEC).

The Registered Continuing Education Providers Program (RCEP) is a single comprehensive education management system for engineers, surveyors, design professionals and quality education providers.

 

 

Programs with this symbol signify approval with the Ohio Board of Building Standards (BBS) for Continuing Education Accreditation.

 

 

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Conference Menues


~ Bon Appétit!

Monday

 

12:00p - 1:00p  Lunch ~ Soup, Salad & Sandwich…
Enjoy delicious potato cheese soup, Mixed Greens Salad or Italian pasta salad, build your own deli sandwich (Ham, Turkey, Roast Beef, Assorted Cheeses) & finish with a sweet dessert bar…. Coffee & Ice Tea

 

 

Tuesday

 

11:30a - 12:45p  Lunch ~ Burgers and Chicken off the grill….
Angus burgers and grilled chicken breasts, assorte cheeses, chili, garlic potato wedges, whole kernel buttered corn and Cheese Cake…. Coffee & Ice Tea