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Conference Schedule

Seminar Outlines, Program Descriptions, and Menus

February 25 and 26, 2019

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Sunday Feb 24, 2019

 

8:00pm - 9:00pm 

 

Hotel Lobby

Early Arrival Conference Registration and Hospitality

 

6:30pm - 12:00am

Exhibitor Set-up

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Monday February 25, 2019

 

8:30am - 11:00am

 

Franklin Rooms A, B, C, & D 

(Sponsored by UL FIrefighter Safety Research Institute)

Conference Open and Keynote Session

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11:00am - 12:00pm

 

Franklin Lobby / Exhibit area

Golden Hour of Technology

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12:00pm - 1:00pm

 

McKinley & Hayes Meeting Rooms  (located on the first floor)

(Sponsored by Honeywell)  

Lunch

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1:00pm - 2:00pm

 

Franklin Rooms A & B
Sponsored by Telgian

  139 - Introduction to NFPA 72 Fire Alarm Systems

 

Franklin Rooms C & D
16 - Live and Learn: Lessons learned from 5 years of Home Safety Walk-Throughs 


Union Rooms A & B

UL Firefighter Safety Research Institute - Firefighter Safety Symposium

04 - FD Operations in Highrise and Large area structures

 

Union Rooms C & D

  25 - Emergency Communication Systems/Mass Notification System Basics, Intelligibility and Code Updates

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2:15pm - 3:15pm

 

Franklin Rooms A & B
Sponsored by Telgian

  140 - NFPA 72 Fire Alarm Testing and Inspections, can you self-perform them

   (This presentation will also cover the significant changes to NFPA 72 2016)

 

Franklin Rooms C & D
02 - Comprehensive (campus) Fire and Life Safety Public Education Programs


Union Rooms A & B

UL Firefighter Safety Research Institute - Firefighter Safety Symposium

230 - Firefighter Safety and Coordinated Ventilation - Technical Panel

 

Union Rooms C & D

23 - Emergency Responder Radio Communication Enhancement Systems

 

Union Room E

07 - Rescue4PTSD -What is it like to have PTSD?  

 

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3:15pm - 3:45pm

 

Franklin Lobby / Exhibit area

(Sponsored by Honeywell)  

Afternoon Break with Exhibitors

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3:45pm - 4:45pm

Franklin Rooms A & B
Sponsored by Telgian

  141 - What Codes Apply to Fire Alarm Systems - Significant Changes to the International Fire Code

 

Franklin Rooms C & D
03 - Creating an Effective Campus Safety Education Program

 

Union Rooms A & B

UL Firefighter Safety Research Institute - Firefighter Safety Symposium

229 - Updates to UL 217 - Residential Smoke Detectors

 

Union Rooms C & D

37 - Fires During Construction

 

Union Room E

26 - "Where’s the Outrage" - Unacceptable Fire Loss Occurring in the United States
  

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Tuesday February 26, 2018

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8:00am - 9:00am

Franklin Rooms A & B
Sponsored by Telgian

  24 - Significant Changes to the 2019 Edition of the NFPA 72® National Fire Alarm and Signaling Code

 

Franklin Rooms C & D
05 - Help Them Help You. Engaging your (Campus) Community in Emergency Procedures


Union Rooms A & B

UL Firefighter Safety Research Institute - Firefighter Safety Symposium

08 - Saving Those Who Save Others - FIre and EMS Suicide Awareness

 

Union Rooms C & D

12 - Small Unmanned Aircraft Systems (sUAS) as a Tool for Fire Agencies (Drones)

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9:00am - 9:30am

 

Franklin Lobby / Exhibit area

(Sponsored by Honeywell)  

Mid-Morning Break with Exhibitors

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9:30am - 10:30am

Franklin Rooms A & B
Sponsored by Telgian

  142 - NFPA 25 and 72, Compliance Need Not Break The Bank

 

Franklin Rooms C & D
18 - Notes from a Mass Shooting EOC; Lessons Learned to Streamline Your Command and
Coordination.

  

Union Rooms A & B

UL Firefighter Safety Research Institute - Firefighter Safety Symposium

246 - Evaluation of Ventilation-Controlled Fires in L-Shaped Training Props

 

Union Rooms C & D

36 - Engineered Wood I-Joists and Fire Fighter Safety

 

Taft Rooms A & B

28 - Understanding ASTM E84 Test Reports, Verifying Your Building Products or Systems Meet Designated Fire and Flammability Requirements

 

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10:45am - 11:45am

Franklin Rooms A & B 
Sponsored by Telgian

143 - Integrating Fire Safety Systems in a Campus Based Environment

 

Franklin Rooms C & D
22 - How to Conduct a Fire Evacuation Analysis on University or Campus Based Buildings

 

Union Rooms A & B

UL Firefighter Safety Research Institute - Firefighter Safety Symposium

247 - Study of the Fire Dynamics in Concrete Live Fire Training Buildings: Safety and Fidelity Considerations

  

Union Rooms C & D

27 - Understanding Fire Department Operations in Properties Protected by Fire Sprinklers and Standpipes

 

Taft Rooms A & B

19 - What the Fire Service Needs to Know about Tall Mass Timber Buildings

 

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12:00pm - 1:00pm

 

Hayes Meeting Room   (located on the first floor)

(Sponsored by Honeywell)  

Lunch

 

Mckinley Meeting Room  (located on the first floor)

(Sponsored by Fire Code Academy)

Ohio Fire Officials Meeting and Lunch

 

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1:00pm - 2:00pm

 

Franklin Rooms A & B
Sponsored by Telgian

  13 - Detecting, Preventing, and Addressing Corrosion in Fire Sprinkler Systems

 

Franklin Rooms C & D

35 - Performance Codes and the Possible Effect on Fire Department Operations
 .

Union Rooms A & B

UL Firefighter Safety Research Institute - Firefighter Safety Symposium

248 - The Data Driven Fire Department – Using Data to Tell Your Story

 

Union Rooms C & D

21 - Inspection of commercial Cooking Appliances & ANSI/IKECA C-10  Overview

 

Taft Rooms A & B

45 - After the Fire (Hour 1)

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2:15pm - 3:15pm

 

Franklin Rooms A & B
Sponsored by Telgian

  44 - Fire Sprinklers (101) – New Technology in Fire Protection

 

Franklin Rooms C & D
20 -  Short-term Property Rentals of 4 Bedrooms or Less Advertised on Websites Like "Airbnb.com"  and Others.

 

Union Rooms A & B

UL Firefighter Safety Research Institute - Firefighter Safety Symposium

234 - Adrenaline Based Fire Ground Tactics: A Receipe for Disaster

 

Union Rooms C & D

06 - Preparing a Maintenance Facility to Repair Lighter than Air Fueled Vehicles.

 

Taft Rooms A & B

45 - After the Fire (Hour 2)

 

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Workshop and  Program Descriptions

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02 Campus Fire and Life Safety Public Education: “Making Fire Safety Fun Again”

Presented by: Gettysburg College

 

Learn the basics for Creating and implementing a comprehensive Campus Fire and Life Safety educational program as well as how to enhance existing programs with assessment and evaluations. Learn five principle components of a fire and life safety programing for young adults living in a campus environment:   Fundamentals; Communication; Delivering Procedural Information; Changing Unsafe Behaviors and Evaluation. Marketing these programs to enhance student learning, interest and participation is the critical key to success.   Review a few popular programs that help many campuses across the county such as the mock dorm room burn, which gets great reviews from students.   Who delivers these programs are as important as the material, peer to peer educational opportunities and best practices will be discussed.

 

Learning Outcomes

1. Define fundamental elements of a public Education Program

2. Discuss potential challenges to program development

3. Identify challenges that may impact communication with campus staff, students and other stakeholders

4. Prioritize and develop procedural information to present to a campus community

5. Create an evaluation plan for a public education program

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03 Creating a Campus Safety Education Program

Presented by: Moody Bible Institute

 

Whether you are trying to explain to your board or administration what your department actually does, or you are preparing for an audit from the Department of Education, you probably need a better way to track all your great work and getting other departments to participate.  Learn how to implement and track your own safety education programs as I share what I learned from a Department of Education Program Review in 2014.  This Safety Education Program is a collaborative committee with representation from Human Resources, Financial Aid, Student Life, Title IX, Legal, and Public Safety teams. My Safety Education program serves as a template and log, which includes Emergency Preparedness Training, RA Training, Desk Worker Safety Training, Fire Safety, Safety Orientation, Title IX Training, and more. This presentation will focus on developing the program, involving and holding key stakeholders accountable, and making sure the training is effective. With limited staff and resources, my program has taken years to develop. Each year I identified ambitious but achievable ways to develop campus training. I want to show you some of those steps, so that you can leave with something practical to help you create a safer environment on your campus and address compliance requirements.

 

Learning Outcomes  

1. Campus Safety Education leads to Clery Compliance

2. Lessons learned from lockdowns and lockdown drills

3. Lessons learned from evacuations and evacuation drills

4. Recommendations for tracking training initiatives

5. Practical training development concepts

 

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04 Fire Department Operations in High-Rise and Large-Area Structures

Presented by: Dayton (Ohio) Fire Department

 

Do your fire companies really know the buildings in their first-due district?  Various concepts of fire protection systems, some of which can be quite complicated or intimidating, and brought down "to the street" for firefighters and company officers.  Significant knowledge of standpipe and sprinkler systems, fire pumps, elevators, fire alarm control panels, smoke control systems, and other building safety features is often reserved for fire prevention or code enforcement personnel.  Students will gain an understanding of complex fire protection system components that will enable them to apply the easy-to-remember principles on working incidents.  Attendees are also guided in developing a realistic and engaging company-level pre-incident planning program.  Case studies involving line-of-duty deaths and high-dollar-loss fires that occurred in buildings despite fire protection systems being in place are also examined.

 

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05 Help them help you. Engaging your Campus Community in Emergency Procedures

Presented by: Moody Bible Institute

 

College environments are ripe with community. Students, parents, faculty, staff, and alumni are all interested in what you are doing to keep them and the campus safe. You already know you are putting in the hard work behind the scenes: preparing lockdown drills, conducting evacuation drills, etc. But, how do you engage your community? Many colleges are re-examining how they engage their communities in order to make the most impact in the Community. How about we get back to the basics by creating environments to converse with our communities and using technology along the way to help us. Participants will learn different ways to engage their campus community, different emergency procedures training and awareness programs, and ways to supplement with social media outreach. The great thing about engaging your campus community is that you do not have to do it alone; Help them help you.

 

Learning Outcomes  

Participants will learn different ways to engage their campus community, different emergency procedures training and awareness programs, and ways to supplement with social media outreach.

 

The following topics will be addressed in the presentation:

1. Active Shooter and "Run-Hide-Fight"

2. Coordinating, Managing, and Understanding Fire Drills

3. Student/RA Training & Education

4. Creating effective training and educational programs... What works and what does not

5. Fire and Life Safety Public Education

 

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06 Preparing a Maintenance Facility to Repair Lighter than Air Fueled Vehicles

Presented by: Sierra Monitor Corp.

 

Abstract: Applying the code recommendations from NFPA and the ICC on the proper modification and or designs necessary to a facility that will maintain “lighter than air fueled vehicles.”  These fuels include natural gas and hydrogen.  We will examine what is drafted in the code and how we apply this to the design of the facilities.  This will include the alarming systems, and mitigation system.  We will also investigate the modifications necessary in existing facilities to insure code compliance, insurance approval and protection of occupants.

 

Learning Outcomes

1. Be able to identify the applicable codes that cover the design or modification of a facility

2. Be able to apply these codes

3. Be able to identify deficiencies in design and improper equipment selection

4. Be able to assist in the proper design of these systems.

 

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08 Saving Those Who Save Others

Presented by: The Firefighter Behavioral Health Alliance

 

A look at FF/EMS suicide prevention/awareness course designed to educate attendees on warning signs/symptoms, communications, emotional and physical behaviors. 

 

Learning Outcomes

1. To introduce attendees to emotional and behavioral awareness.

2. To introduce attendees to the various signs & symptoms of possible suicidal FF/EMS.

3. Improve communication skills.

4. Discussion of suicide rates within the EMS and Fire Service

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12 Small Unmanned Aircraft Systems (sUAS) as a Tool for Fire Agencies

Presented by: Ohio Peace Officer Training Academy - Office of Ohio Attorney General

 

This presentation will include a PowerPoint presentation with photos and videos included. There will also be on display for the participants to view a sUAS with sensors attached. Small Unmanned Aircraft Systems or Drones as they are commonly referred to, are becoming fast evolving technologies and tools for Public Safety. sUAS is a tool that can benefit Fire Agencies and assist in keeping fire personnel out of harm’s way! Open discussion will be stressed during the presentation. Areas covered will include 360 Degree Incident Size-Up, Post Traffic Crash Scene, Brush Fires, Entry and Exit Access to Wild Land Fires, Aerial Recon of Structure Fires, Arson Investigations, Aerial Recon of HAZMAT Incidents and Train Derailments, Water Related Rescues, Entrapments, Rapid Storm Damage/Natural Disasters Assessments, Building Inspections, Scene Illumination, and Various Types of Agency Training. Videos will show how sUAS can be used as an effective tool during HAZMAT incidents. Various types of sUAS and related equipment will also be discussed. FAA Part 107 Remote Pilot Certification requirements will be addressed. Also airspace issues, as well as authorizations and waivers from the FAA will be addressed.

 

Learning Outcomes

1. Have a better understanding of how sUAS can benefit their agency and community.

2. See how other Fire Agencies are using sUAS.

3. Understand what is required from the FAA to be able to use a sUAS.

4. Good look at how sUAS can be used in place of personnel walking into a HAZMAT incident.

5. See firsthand sUAS and related equipment.

 

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13 Detecting, Preventing, and Addressing Corrosion in Sprinkler Systems

Presented by: Potter Electric Signal Company, LLC

 

Corrosion has long been one of the enemies of fire sprinkler systems. But it’s often misunderstood and because of that, the solutions for addressing it are sometimes misguided. In this interactive presentation, participants will learn how corrosion affects automatic fire sprinkler systems, what steps fire codes require to be taken to address this problem, and which solutions work best. Additionally, those attending will also learn about the history of sprinkler system success and what common factors are often involved when rare system failures do occur.

 

Learning Outcomes

1. Understand how corrosion affects sprinkler system performance.

2. Find the internal inspection requirements in NFPA 25-2014 and explain their history.

3. Recognize the difference between internal inspections (assessments) and obstruction investigations.

4. Describe how corrosion occurs and what factors influence it.

5. Identify common corrosion signs.

6. Use the tools in NFPA 25 and best practices used by others to improve the application and enforcement of the standard.

 

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15 Live and Learn: Lessons learned from 5 years of Home Safety Walk-Throughs

Presented by: The Ohio State University

 

The Ohio State University and Columbus Division of Fire have partnered for the last 5 years to provide comprehensive off-campus safety education to thousands of Ohio State Students. This presentation focuses on the lessons learned after the first five years of this innovative program and strategies that the team used to improve the program moving forward. Attendees will be able to strategize for implementation and improvement of their campus fire programs.

 

Learning Outcomes:

1. Attendees will be able to identify at least one challenge of implementing a campus fire safety program.

2. Attendees will be able to apply at least one program planning strategy to their own professional work.

3. Attendees will be able to identify at least one benefit of implementing a campus fire safety program.

4. Attendees will be able to propose at least one tangible improvement for their professional work.

 

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18 Notes from a Mass Shooting EOC

Presented by: Preparedness Solutions, Inc.

 

Today’s emergency management landscape is more complex, more interconnected; and often

more unpredictable than in the past. Shootings and large-scale disasters are occurring with more

frequency. Given this state of affairs, emergency operations centers must be tasked with not

only meeting these challenges but surviving and thriving too. Mr. Burdiss will discuss his 2015

EOC activation to a mass shooting on his university campus as well as notes he gleaned from

responding to to large Type I wildfires. This presentation will share excerpts from his notes and

observations that anyone can take back and use in their command centers today. You will learn

why you need more dry erase markers; how charging cords can cure dissent, and why you should

buy cell phones like a mobster. Marc will cover where you need to be focused today to be ready

for tomorrow. This talk will include a mixture of innovations, best practices, hints, and

techniques to have your EOC running like a well-oiled machine.

 

Learning Outcomes

Provide an overview of EOC operations in a large-scale disaster. Discuss pitfalls and successes

during long-term EOC activations. Share tips and tricks to streamline EOC effectiveness.

 

1. Attendees will learn about an EOC’s role in supporting a large dynamic incident.

2. Attendees will take away many tips and techniques that they can implement immediately to streamline EOC effectiveness.

3. Attendees will learn about potential pitfalls in an EOC environment and tools to avoid or overcome them.

4. Attendees will learn what technology is needed and what technology is not worth the effort and expense.

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19 What the Fire Service Needs to Know about Tall Mass Timber Buildings

Presented by American Wood Council

 

Description: In early 2016, the ICC Board of Directors approved the creation of an ad hoc committee to explore the building science of tall wood buildings with the scope being to investigate the feasibility of and take action to develop code changes for tall wood buildings. The TWB developed its own test scenario(s) to substantiate any code change proposals (testing was carried out at ATF labs); and worked to develop a comprehensive set of technically-substantiated code changes for consideration during the 2018 Group A code development process. This program explains the science behind tall mass timber buildings; their components and fire life safety systems. It discusses the fire testing that occurred and the performance of the mass timber.

 

Learning Objectives:

1. Recognize how the new types of construction compare with existing types of construction in the International Building Code and specify the inherent differences and conservative approaches the new types have.
2. Understand the process by which the allowable heights, areas, and number of stories permitted for the proposed mass timber types of construction were developed and will be able to utilize the information for building design.
3. State the fire resistance requirements for mass timber building elements. Further, they will be able to distinguish when and where non-combustible protection can be omitted.
4. Identify safeguards that must occur during construction and ongoing inspection requirements

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20 Short-term Property Rentals of 4 Bedrooms or Less on Websites Like "Airbnb.com", etc..

Presented by: Massillon, Ohio Fire Department

 

Companies like Airbnb and VRBO (Vacation Rentals By Owner) have grown exponentially in size, popularity, and net worth within the last ten years.  But how much do you really know about what these companies do? Did you know they are doing it in your local jurisdiction? Did you know that many of these businesses are not compliant with local ordinance and state code? The focus of this one-hour presentation is to educate fire prevention, code enforcement, building, and tax officials as to what I found occurring within my own jurisdiction and throughout the State of Ohio.  During the presentation, the audience will gain a basic understanding of:

 

Learning Outcomes

1. What websites like Airbnb.com and VRBO.com are doing and why we should be concerned.

2. Applying fire, building, and housing code to these businesses.

3. The “variety” of properties being advertised as short-term rentals.

4. Local ordinance and the power to regulate these businesses.

5. The potential danger of these properties to life and community.

 

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21 Inspection of commercial Cooking Appliances & ANSI/IKECA C-10 over view

Presented by: Precision Kleen, Inc. Representing the Kitchen Exhaust Cleaning Association and Industry

 

This top 10 list will outline the important areas all code officials should use during routine inspections, the topics will cover, Fire protection, Specialty Equipment, Exhaust Fans, Duct work, Exhaust Hoods, Cooking Equipment, New/existing construction, Proper Documentation and the Service Provider

 

Learning Outcomes:
We will improve defining code requirements, define common problems found in eating & drinking establishments, reduce the risk of fire and property loss, provide a greater awareness of current industry issues
.

 

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22 How to Conduct a Fire Evacuation Analysis on University or Campus Buildings

Presented by:  Eastern Kentucky University - Fire Protection and Safety Engineering Technology

 

The human behavior factor is one of the most difficult things to predict in a fire evacuation. Buildings are designed per codes and standards, but codes and standards cannot always take this human behavior factor into consideration.  Being able to calculate evacuation times allows an engineer or safety professional to determine any additional considerations that may be required when renovating or designing a building. Conducting this type of analysis allows for consideration of occupant characteristics, building characteristics, and even fire characteristics and how they may all play a factor on evacuation times. This lecture will give the basics to how to conduct this type of analysis and provide resources of where to find additional information on the subject

 

Learning Outcomes

1. Identify relevant fire scenarios expected on a University Campus based on historical research

Find relevant data needed to calculate the RSET for any building

2. Determine which human characteristics may play a role in a given building

3. Determine how different building characteristics can effect evacuation

4. Calculate RSET times for different buildings and scenarios

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23 Emergency Responder Radio Communication Enhancement Systems - (Bi Directional Amplifier)

Presented by: Honeywell | Security and Fire

 

Very informational presentation of the evolution of code requirements for ERRCES.  Presentation defines the reasons for Emergency Responder Radio Signal impairment inside buildings, code required methods and definitions of measuring those signals and code definition of the required solution for those impairments.  Presentation will discuss difference in State and Local requirements accross the US.  UL 2524 will also be discussed as part of the presentation and the System requirements that includes to make these systems robust, safe, reliable and not cause issues with a Public Safety Radio Network it is connected to.

 

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24 Changes to the 2019 edition of the NFPA 72® National Fire Alarm and Signaling Code

Presented by: Honeywell | Security and Fire

 

An informative and unbiased presentation covering key changes to the 2019 edition of the NFPA 72® National Fire Alarm and Signaling Code as well as providing the reasons for the changes and how they will impact public life safety. The discussion will provide an overview of new requirements for smoke detection, carbon monoxide detection, sending signals to supervising stations, Building System Information Unit (BSIU) controling fire alarm system functions, requirements for class A wireless pathways and several changes relating to elevators.

 

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25 Emergency Comm Systems/Mass Notification System Basics, Intelligibility and Code Updates

Presented by: Honeywell | Security and Fire

 

An informative and unbiased presentation explaining the concept of mass notification and how it evolved. It will review the history and development of these systems in NFPA 72, as well as covering some key requirements in NFPA 72, including providing a basic understanding of what intelligibly is, and point out when intelligibility is required. The presentation will provide an overview of several changes to the 2015 & 2018 Model Codes that may lead to more ECS/MNS being installed as well as providing information as to why these new requirements were needed and how they will enhance public life safety.

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26 Where’s the Outrage - Unacceptable Fire Loss Occurring in the United States
New York State Division of Homeland Security and Emergency Services - Office of Fire Prevention and Control

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“Where’s The Outrage” is a powerful, high impact presentation intended to incite appropriate anger and action toward the unacceptable fire loss occurring in the U.S. year after year after year. Founded in campus fire losses, it addresses the reality of the fire problem and offers solutions … elimination of fire deaths by a proven, inexpensive, morally right answer. It addresses the myths of fire and the cataclysmic impact of experiencing a fire. While valuable for anyone in the fire service, prevention, and education worlds, its college impact is the need to challenge students to arrive at graduation without a fire experience; even more, the challenge to adopt a fire safe lifestyle which, as they become the doctors and attorneys and community planners and educators and fire service leaders and codes professionals and moms and dads of the future will reduce or eliminate needless and inexcusable fire deaths. It promotes a culture shift to making preventable fire intolerable.

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27 Understanding Fire Department Operations in Properties Protected by Fire Sprinklers and Standpipes

Presented by: The National Fire Sprinkler Association 

 

This presentation was developed for operational level firefighters and officers to allow for a better understanding of 13E - The Recommended Practice for Fire Department Operations in Properties Protected by Sprinklers and Standpipes. This presentation will provide an increased situational knowledge of basic fire protection systems, codes vs standards, the NFPA 13’s, building pre-plaining vs inspections which are all tied to the principles of 13E. The program uses multiple examples of basic system overviews, all aim at allowing the fire service personnel to apply the concepts of 13E in making more appropriate tactical responses.  

 

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28 Understanding ASTM E84 Test Reports, Verifying Your Building Products or Systems Meet Designated Fire and Flammability Requirements

Presented by: GBH International

 

ASTM E84 is referenced in many sections of the codes.  Unfortunately, this very old fire test was not developed with modern materials in mind, and some people have found creative ways to cheat the test to provide misleadingly positive results.  Learn about this test, how to read the test reports, and identify tests that have been “gamed” to provide an illusion of safety. 

 

Learning Outcomes

1. Have a general understanding of ASTM E84, one of the most common fire tests referenced in the codes

2. Understand how specimens are prepared for testing and when specific mounting methods are required for certain products or materials

3. Be able to identify misuses of ASTM E84 for products for which it was not intended

4. Be able to identify instances of inappropriate modifications to the test which will give deceptive results

5. Be familiar with ASTM E2989, a guide for determining if a test report is still applicable for the intended use

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35 Performance Codes and the possible effect on Fire Department Operations
Presented by: The National Fire Sprinkler Association

   .

Performance Codes are becoming more and more common and fire departments need to be aware of the concept.  In as much as these codes are based upon various “assumptions” and “fire safety performance goals, of which the fire department may not be aware, these codes may pose a dilemma for fire departments in both the fireground tactical and fire safety education arenas.

  .

The presentation will include description of our current code technology and describe the performance code concept.  Performance-based codes could do away with most of the prescriptive requirements; in fact, in one country that has embraced the philosophy, this concept has reduced their building code from 330 pages to 23.  A performance-based code will require a process where fire safety goals will be established, and it will give the designer the option to utilize any approved method of meeting those goals.  It was found that the ultimate difference between the two types of codes is that prescriptive codes require that one meet the code’s intent, without ever enumerating what the intent is; performance codes force the owners and designers to clearly define their intent, by documenting design assumptions and design objectives.  Fire departments unfamiliar with the process could be at a major disadvantage in emergency response operations, compromising firefighter safety.

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Learning Outcomes:

1. Participants will learn the difference between “prescriptive” and “performance” codes.
2. Participants will understand how structures built to a performance code may conflict with traditional fire department tactics.
3. Participants will learn to develop generic performance code criteria that will benefit firefighter safety
4. Participants will learn to develop systems for gathering and disseminating vital building information.

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36 Engineered Wood I-Joists and Fire Fighter Safety
Presented by: Integra Code Consultants

   .

This program identifies the features and benefits of wood I-joists which explains the prevalence in the market.  The program also explains UL fire testing that identified the fire performance failures or light frame floor assemblies which led to changes in the floor protection requirements of the International Residential Code® (IRC®).  Those IRC® protection requirements are explained.  Alternate methods of protecting I-joist assemblies per ICC-ES® Acceptance Criteria AC14 are explained along with the details of acceptable installation of specific assemblies.  A statewide survey of fire marshal is reported to give attendees a sense of peer consensus on acceptable methods of protecting wood I-joist floors.

Learning Outcomes
1. Identify features, benefits and fire safety challenges for wood I-joist construction.
2. Explain results of a statewide fire marshal study on wood I-joist and protection awareness.
3. Identify seven methods to protect engineered wood construction to safeguard public and first responders.
4.
Identify independent agency reports that evaluate protection equivalencies.

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37 Fires During Construction
Presented by: Integra Code Consultants

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In recent years, the media has reported regularly on significant fires in buildings under construction.  While most have occurred in multi-family or mixed uses, the risk of fire during construction is high in any occupancy when buildings are particularly vulnerable.

The International Codes have a variety of strategies to prevent and mitigate unwanted fires during construction.

This course will introduce attendees to several of the recent major fires and their causes, the many fire-related hazards that exist on a construction site, the International Building and Fire Code requirements for fire protection safeguards during construction and solutions for developing simple fire safety strategies.  There also will be information on building materials and construction industry efforts to reduce fire losses.

Learning Outcomes
1. Identify recent major fires and their causes
2. Identify the I Code regulations for fire safety during building construction, alteration and demolition.
3. Verify code compliance for storage, handling and use of flammable gases, liquids and explosives used in conjunction with building construction, alteration or demolition so that applicable codes are addressed, and all deficiencies are identified and corrected in accordance with the policies of his/her jurisdiction.
4. Develop a model pre-fire plan format for buildings under construction, alteration or demolition.
Identify existing building materials and construction industry resources for training, education and mitigation.

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44 Fire Sprinklers (101) – New Technology in Fire Protection
Presented by: Viking Corporation

 

Whether it’s Inspecting, designing, installing fire sprinklers in a new building or the need to replace existing sprinklers, it is very important to understand the different fire sprinkler types. The form and shape, as well as the use and purpose, differs among sprinkler head types. Knowing about the sprinkler and what is required is important.

Once you've selected a sprinkler type, additional options become available including temperature, finish, and response type. While we will address these options, it is important to know that each type of fire sprinkler meets a different need so therefore getting the right sprinkler (head) is paramount.

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100 Series - Sponsored and Presented by Telgian

  

 

139 Introduction to NFPA 72 Fire Alarm Systems

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Fire alarm systems has several devices working together to detect and warn people through visual and audio appliances when smoke, fire, carbon monoxide or other emergencies are present. These alarms may be activated automatically from smoke detectors, and heat detectors or may also be activated via manual fire alarm activation devices such as manual call points or pull stations.

Fire alarm systems are essential for the adequate detection and warning of a fire situation within commercial and residential premises. The detection, visual and audible requirements of a fire alarm system are dependent on the layout and use of the building. It is due to the diversity of these applications that fire alarm panels and related accessories have been developed to meet these varying needs.

 

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140 - NFPA 72 Fire Alarm Testing and Inspections, can you self-perform them

(This presentation will also discuss the significant changes to NFPA 72 2016)

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This presentation will include an overview of the test and inspection requirements as defined by NFPA 72, The National Fire Alarm and Signaling Code.. This program will also stress the newly added definitions of qualified personnel and a few of the avenues to obtain these qualifications. The program will define the roles of the person conducting, inspection, testing, programming and servicing of the fire alarm system as well as review the documentation requirements for both the personnel and the test and inspection activities.

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141 - What Codes Apply to Fire Alarm Systems - Significant Changes to the International Fire Code

 

Changes in the International Fire Code (IFC) drive the requirements for when (and where) fire alarm systems are required to be installed in occupancies governed by the code. The International Code Council (ICC) revises the code set every three (3) years, providing and update to the requirements based on continuing experience and updates to industry best practices.

 

This seminar will cover the following:

       ·         Code and standard defined – discussion of differences – discussion of promulgation

·         Legacy Chapter 9 requirements

·         New Chapter 9 requirements (Both this and the above slightly focused on educational and residential occupancies)

·         Impact of changes

·         Examples of impacts

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142  NFPA 25 and 72, Compliance Need Not Break The Bank

The cost effective maintenance of fire and life safety systems is always a challenge but even more so in a down economy that is filled with corporative directives to lower costs. This seminar examines the published requirements for the inspection, testing, and maintenance for fire suppression and fire alarm systems along with strategies for complying with the requirements without busting the bank. The session reviews real world examples where property owners, authorities having jurisdiction, and service providers work together to manage the risk of fire loss while keeping the costs as low as possible.

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143  Integrating Fire Safety Systems in a Campus Based Environment

While there are many important systems and equipment in a campus-based and business environment, perhaps none is more important than a properly working fire alarm/security system. When people go off to work and parents send their children off to school, they put their trust in the fire/security system that it will keep them safe and secure while there.

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There are many advantages to integrating fire, security and life safety systems. Above all, an integrated fire and security system can expedite the handling of the emergency situation. With an integrated system, building occupants can be alerted more quickly to an emergency situation and be able to respond accordingly.

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This presentation will discuss and focus integration of these systems to keep people, property, and assets safe and secure while insuring business and operational continuity. There is, however, a growing potential for code compliance conflict between the two critical disciplines.

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200 Series - UL Firefighter Safety and Wellness Symposium

 

 
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230 - Firefighter Safety and Coordinated Ventilation

Presented by:

Brad French

Captain - Dayton Fire Department

Board of Directors - International Society of Fire Service Instructors

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229 - Updates to UL 217 - Residential Smoke Detectors

Presented by:

Sean DeCrane, Manager, Industry Relations

Building & Life Safety Technologies - UL LLC

Board of Directors - UL Firefighter Safety Research Institute

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In the United States we have had several discussions on the performance of the various technologies in regards to the optimal performance of residential smoke alarms. Three States in the US undertook the establishment of Ad Hoc Committees to review the issue and publish recommendations in regards to the best approach to life safety. Overwhelmingly these reports have recommended multiple technologies in multiple locations for the best performance.


In response to the issues raised, UL invested resources to conduct additional research to establish recommended changes to the UL 217 Standard to enhance the performance of smoke alarms under fire conditions. This proposed presentation will summarize the issues, the results of the research and subsequent changes to the smoke alarm standard.
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234 - Adrenaline Based Fire Ground Tactics: A Receipe for Disaster

Presented by:

Scott Rupp Lieutenant

Training and Special Operations Bureau - Springfield Fire Department

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246 - Evaluation of Ventilation-Controlled Fires in L-Shaped Training Props

Presented by:

Joe Willi, Research Engineer

UL Firefighter Safety Research Institute

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Recent fireground line of duty deaths have highlighted the importance for firefighters to understand ventilation-limited fire dynamics. This need is reflected in the 2013 edition of NFPA 1403: Standard on Live-Fire Training, which includes guidelines for conducting ventilation-limited fire training. This presentation examines the ability of three different fuel loads to produce ventilation-controlled fire conditions within various types of L-shaped training props. Two fuel packages contained wood-based materials to be compliant with NFPA 1403, and the third was composed of modern furnishings.


Experiments were conducted to compare the thermal environments created by fires in L-shaped props with three different wall lining configurations: one that resembled modern residential construction and two fabricated from metal shipping containers with corrugated steel walls. Repeatable ventilation-limited conditions were produced by all three fuel packages in each prop. Furthermore, heat flux and temperature measurements at potential locations of trainees exceeded exposure limits of firefighter PPE during a number of the experiments. Finally, differences between thermal environments generated within the various props, including during scenarios involving interior suppression, will be discussed.
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247 - Study of the Fire Dynamics in Concrete Live Fire Training Buildings: Safety and Fidelity Considerations

Presented by:

Jack Regan, Research Engineer

UL Firefighter Safety Research Institute

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Several recent firefighter line-of-duty deaths have occurred in recent years as a result of rapid fire progression, highlighting the need for firefighters to understand the fire dynamics of ventilation-limited fires. Studies on firefighter safety have indicated that the higher synthetic content of contemporary furnishings has resulted in higher heat release rates than the wood-based fuels permitted for use in live fire training by NFPA 1403: Standard on Live Fire Training.

 

A series of 8 experiments was conducted comparing the fire dynamics produced in a concrete live fire training building by two NFPA 1403-compliant fuel loads to a fuel load composed of furnishings. The concrete fire training building was instrumented with sensors to measure temperature, heat flux, pressure, and gas velocity. The results indicated that the training fuel packages did not replicate ventilation-controlled conditions, due in part to the large amount of leakage in the concrete live fire training building. Additionally, conditions were created using training fuel packages that had the potential to cause burn injuries to firefighters.  .

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248 - The Data Driven Fire Department – Using Data to Tell Your Story

Presented by:

Craig Weinschenk, Research Engineer

UL Firefighter Safety Research Institute

International Public Safety Data Institute  (IPSDI)

 

There is a growing imperative for data-driven decision-making in the fire service. This presentation will share key performance measures that fire departments should be tracking, methods for easily capturing the data needed for those measures, and how to use data to effect change at the administrative, company and individual firefighter levels. Attendees will also view a demonstration of the National Fire Operations Reporting System (NFORS), a live data analytics system available to fire departments through the new International Public Safety data Institute (IPSDI) a nonprofit collaborative group of fire service organizations
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Programs with this symbol signify approval with the Ohio Board of Building Standards (BBS) for Continuing Education Accreditation.

 

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Conference Menues


~ Bon Appétit!

Monday

 

12:00p - 1:00p  Lunch ~ Soup, Salad & Sandwich…
Enjoy delicious potato cheese soup, Mixed Greens Salad or Italian pasta salad, build your own deli sandwich (Ham, Turkey, Roast Beef, Assorted Cheeses) & finish with a sweet dessert bar…. Coffee & Ice Tea

 

 

Tuesday

 

12:00p - 1:00p  Lunch ~ Burgers and Chicken off the grill….
Angus burgers and grilled chicken breasts, assorte cheeses, chili, garlic potato wedges, whole kernel buttered corn and Cheese Cake…. Coffee & Ice Tea